Project: 30 East 20th St.

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The Gabay Building after a face lift by Right Path Windows & Restoration

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As historic restoration contractors, Right Path Windows and Restoration was tasked with fabricating a new two story custom wood storefront and glass system to match the existing historic conditions at the Gabay Building, which was built the Flatiron District in 1915. We worked with the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission to preserve the original appearance of the building.

The project included the two story storefront façade with two large custom wood windows on the first floor and the windows on the second floor had operable transoms.

The wooden storefront was fabricated from Sapele Mahogany. This type of wood machines smoothly and takes finishes well. Engineered stiles and rails were used in the doors, which have a solid stave core that makes them more stable than traditional dimensional lumber.

The storefront facade design included three sets double entry doors. They were oversized at 10 feet tall, being 2-1/4” thick with fixed transoms, and had 1” glass. The doors on either side of the center door serve as entryways to a restaurant, and as such they see heavy traffic.

The center door posed its own challenge. Behind the entry door was a second set of doors in the foyer, which required intricate electronic components. A great deal of coordination was required with the electrical team to ensure that the buzzer unit worked properly for the commercial tenants above. This door also has a tremendous amount of traffic.

The windows on the first and second floor were constructed with 1” Low-e insulated glass. Of particular note is that the owner wanted very much to preserve the original appearance of the windows on the second floor.  We replaced them using insulated wavy restorer glass to maintain the look of the original windows. The casement windows and transoms were operable, allowing for air flow.

Below the pair of custom wood storefront windows was a setback where the glass protruded 16” from the base. Welded tubular steel was anchored into the ground for support.  We designed corbels that were used to conceal the substructure and to enhance the graceful cantilevered effect.

Extensive weatherproofing was applied, in the form of copper panning, flashing, which was soldered together for maximum durability.

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Hardware selected for this project included 4.5” x 4.5” hinges, extension flush bolts, ornate 3” x 18” single cylinder mortised lock sets which feature Fleur-de-Lis back plates and Laurel-style door knobs.

The finished project blended seamlessly with the surrounding architectural features while maintaining the original appearance of the building. We worked closely with the NYC Landmarks Preservation Commission to ensure compliance with their requirements.


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Project: 346 Gramatan Ave.

Project: 346 Gramatan Ave.

The most striking feature of the new façade is the bi-folding door system. This allows the restaurant to open out onto the street front in warmer months. However, for the cooler months, the glass had to ensure that the restaurant and its patrons would be well protected from the chilly temperatures outside.

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Project: 9A Myrtle Ave.

Frank Lloyd Wright designed this house in Great Neck, NY. When the eighty year old custom crafted cypress windows and doors were in need of attention,  we restored them back to their original beauty.

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Window Restoration or Replacement Windows: What's Right for You?

When deciding whether to restore your windows or to replace them, the answer will lie with what sort of property owner you are. There are two types: the historian and the pragmatist.

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Project: Beechmont Dr.

Located on Merchants' Row, aptly named for the Bloomingdale, Macy, Saks and Gimbels families who had country estates located here, this stately home was built in 1927 for Earl Sams, the founder of the J.C. Penney department store.

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Project: 920 Fifth Ave.

Right Path Windows & Restoration restored wooden sash windows in this Italian palazzo-style building. It was designed by noted architect J. E. R. Carpenter and was built in 1922. He lived in the building until his death, as did legendary actress Gloria Swanson. The windows of the penthouse on the corner of 73rd St. overlooking Central Park were in need of restoration

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Project: The Cottage at Seaview

Project: The Cottage at Seaview

This building began its life as a dormitory on Staten Island, housing the workers at the county's "poor farm" from 1916 until the 1930s. At that point, The Cottagebecame the residence of the director of Seaview Hospital before being abandoned in 1973. The property was landmarked in 1985 before being added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. Complete renovations began in 2014.

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Project: The Hotel on Rivington

Project: The Hotel on Rivington

The Hotel on Rivington helped to usher in a new day on the Lower East Side with its sleek and thoroughly modern design. This twenty-story glass and aluminum boutique hotel towers over its neighbors, primarily consisting  of tenement-style buildings with storefronts. The fashionable destination hotel wanted to keep its appearance fresh and up to date with a new facade that included custom-fabricated windows and doors. along with decorative interior wall panels

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Project: 59 Highland Ave.

This historic home was built in 1897, and it remained in the hands of the same family until 1995. Since then it has seen only two owners, both of whom have made renovations and restorations that were true to the home's original character.

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Project: 45 E. 66th St.

45 E. 66th St.

Completed in 1908, this building was originally called Parkview as it afforded a commanding view of Central Park. Located on the corner of 66th St. and Madison Ave., it loomed over the rest of the low scale row houses that existed on the block.

This building ushered in a new style of living on the Upper East Side, with 13-room apartments and accommodations for staff. Rather than residing in single family detached homes, fashionable New Yorkers of the time lived high above the dust and noise of the street level.

It was landmarked by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1977.

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Acetylated Wood for Windows

Although wooden windows have a unique character and beauty all their own, some owners struggle to justify keeping them when the issue of refurbishment arises. When historic buildings intended to see an extended service life confront the issue of window repair, modern advances in chemistry may be able to provide a long-lasting remedy. 

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